We take a look at the best Wi-fi cameras available on the market right now.

As photographers, we like to work fast and efficiently, sharing our latest shots as soon as possible. Time was that Wi-Fi connectivity was a rare bonus, but it’s now becoming increasingly more popular, throughout each manufacturers respective ranges.

Some may wonder the point of a Wi-Fi enabled camera, but there are several advantages. Being able to quickly upload your shots to social media, or email important shots to a client, is great. However, it’s also the case that with most Wi-Fi cameras, you can take remote control of your camera using a smartphone or tablet. That’s very handy for many types of subjects and saves the need to buy a dedicated expensive remote release.

Best Wi-Fi cameras

Canon EOS 6D – £1100

Canon EOS 6D

To date, the Canon EOS 6D remains Canon’s only full-frame camera with wireless connectivity built-in to the body itself. It can transfer images between other Canon Wi-Fi cameras, connect to a smart phone, print to a Wi-Fi printer or connect to a web service. There’s a free Canon Camera Window app (for iOS and Android) which can be downloaded to give you remote control over the camera.

See our review of the Canon EOS 6D

See the best deals for the Canon EOS 6D

Nikon D750 – £1279

Nikon D750

Like Canon, Nikon don’t seem overly keen on placing Wi-FI connectivity on its professional cameras, but you can pick up the full-frame D750 with in-built Wi-Fi. There’s a free app you can download to use the Nikon D750 with your phone or tablet (the Wireless Mobile Utility App) which allows you to both control the camera remotely and share your images with your phone for uploading to social media and the like.

See our review of the Nikon D750

See the best deals for the Nikon D750

Nikon D500 – £1729

Nikon D500 front

We had a four year wait for Nikon to revamp the D300. The company skipped the D400 and has gone straight to the Nikon D500. One of the new features of the camera is inbuilt Wi-Fi. The D500 is an APS-C camera which is aimed at advanced amateurs, and is available to pre-order now.

See our review of the Nikon D500

See the best deals for the Nikon D500

Panasonic TZ80 – £360

Panasonic TZ80

If you’re looking for a travel camera which offers a long zoom then those in Panasonic’s TZ range should suit you well. The latest, the Panasonic TZ80, features a 30x optical zoom. It stands to reason if you’re on holiday taking great photographs, you’ll want to share them with those stuck back home as soon as possible. Luckily the TZ80 has in-built Wi-Fi, but last year’s Panasonic TZ70 also has it too if you’re on a bit more of a budget. Panasonic’s free app is great to use and offers you the ability to take remote control of the camera, download shots to your phone, or upload directly to social media.

See our review of the Panasonic TZ80

Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II – £549

Olympus OM-D E-M10

Many of the current crop of compact system cameras are Wi-Fi enabled, so you should be able to find something to suit your needs across several of the manufacturers. We’ve picked the Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II as a good example of how quick and easy Wi-Fi can be to use. With this camera, you can connect to your phone or tablet very quickly using a QR code displayed on the camera’s screen. Once connected you can download pictures or take remote control of the camera. Other good examples of compact system cameras with Wi-Fi include the Sony A6000, the Fuji X-T1 and the Panasonic Lumix GX8.

Canon EOS 750D – £459


Canon’s mid-range DSLR, the Canon EOS 750D, has a lot of great features, including a 24.2 million pixel sensor. Another one is the inbuilt Wi-Fi which can be used with Canon’s free app to give you control over the camera or to download your shots. If you’re in the market for a mid-range camera, the Nikon D5500 also has inbuilt Wi-Fi.

See our review of the Canon EOS 750D

See the best deals for the Canon EOS 750D

  • Paskis

    The problem with the Panasonics, unless they have had a massive upgrade since I dumped mine last year, is the interface for wireless is the most insane convoluted mess I’ve ever seen. Rather than defining a wireless network with password, then using that for various things, you have to define the network for each type of service you wish to use. And – get this – despite having a touch screen, you cannot use that to enter the network pass codes. ARG! Owning the Panasonic and expecting to heavily use the WiFi features was a constant source of frustration.