Canon EOS 60D vs Nikon D7000: Design

Canon EOS 60D vs Nikon D7000: Design

Structurally the two cameras are relatively different: The D7000 has magnesium alloy top and rear covers for extra toughness and environmentally-sealed joints to help protect the camera from dust and moisture. Although it's not as hardy as a pro-grade body it's really not far away.

By comparison the 60D is built of aluminium and polycarbonate resin with glass fibre which, despite its metal frame interior, looks and feels rather plasticy and especially so considering the previous 50D's magnesium alloy construction. Since the release of the 40D there's been some degree of environmental-sealing which the 60D also sees as a benefit.

In terms of layout the two models are typical of a DSLR layout. The Nikon is typical of the manufacturer's usual layout: very similar to the D300s's layout. Its dual thumbwheel (one front, one rear) controls are very well placed and easy to use. The 60D makes a number of changes over the previous 50D model: the mode dial (which can't rotate continuously, i.e. it has an ‘end point' where it need to be turned back on itself) is to the top left while the display panel is to the top right; next to the latter are four action buttons which now have a better-considered single use rather than the previous multi-press use. However the previous 50D's joystick mechanism to the rear has vanished and been replaced with a d-pad that has a rotational wheel instead of a rear thumbwheel. It's rather a lot going on in one small space.

However the 60D's grip is more prominent and deeper than the D7000's which makes for more comfortable extended use should you weigh the camera up in the hand.

 

Canon 60D vs Nikon D7000 test sample images

Canon 60D vs Nikon D7000 product images gallery