See the Thames in a different light

Museum in Docklands is exhibiting Unquiet Thames, a selection of panoramic photographs by Crispin Hughes depicting life under the river, between the tides.

Museum in Docklands is exhibiting Unquiet Thames, a selection of panoramic photographs by Crispin Hughes depicting life under the river, between the tides. Comprised of eighteen 360° panoramic images, each 2m wide, the exhibition reveals structures hidden under the water in areas unseen by the majority of people as they walk above. Crispin says: ‘Most of these places were not designed to be seen by the general public at all and are often an amalgam of very ancient timbers and modern steel and concrete.’ While taking the photos, Crispin had to be aware of the rising tide, which would affect the position of items in the scene. In its heyday the Thames was of great social and economic importance as a shipping plane, connecting the city to the outside world and inspiring artists. Recently the river has seen a resurgence in popularity, with new river services for tourists and commuters. Each panorama is comprised of eight photographs stitched together. Crispin took the photographs by mounting a digital SLR and 17mm lens on a tripod, which he rotated. Located on West India Quay, London, the exhibition runs at Museum in Docklands from 1st February – 5th June. Exhibition entry is free with entry to the museum, which costs £5 for adults and £3 for concessions. Children under 16 get in free. Call 0870 444 3856 for more details.

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