Fujifilm X-T1 vs Nikon Df

Although the Fujifilm X-T1 and Nikon Df might be quite different models in terms of their specification, they represent a very similar proposition in terms of their target market and ideology.

In the X-T1 and Df, Nikon and Fujifilm have created cameras to meet the demand for a digital camera that handles like a film camera. Both of these models is a different answer to the same question, with each a pastiche of a 1970s film SLR.

On the one side is a retro-looking DSLR with a full-frame sensor and a large optical viewfinder, and on the other is a smaller and lighter CSC with an APS-C-sized sensor and an EVF, with each offers an array of buttons and dials.

But despite these differences, the two will be competing for the same purchaser when it comes to the shop floor, and if you’re looking for a premium retro camera which is best suited to your needs?

Fujifilm X-T1 vs Nikon Df paired

Camera size

When the Nikon Df was launched, it was the hope of many that the size of the camera would be more in keeping with the that of the company’s FM or FE film range. Better still, many hoped that the camera would match the 53mm depth of the smallest Nikon F-mount camera, the FG.

Yet to produce something of this size with current technology is difficult. There is around a millimetre difference between the focal plane and the rear of the Nikon Df and Fuji X-T1 digital cameras.

What makes these two cameras so different in size is due to what is happening in front of the sensor.

In the case of the X-T1, there is no mirror mechanism. The back flange distance from the lens mount to the sensor is 17.7mm on the Fujifilm X mount. Compare this to the 46.5mm distance between the mount and focal plane on Nikon F-mount cameras.

It is clear to see the difference that the SLR mechanism makes to the size of the camera. In fact, the flange back distance of the Nikon F is almost the same as the entire 47mm thickness of the X-T1 body. Take the handgrip out of the equation and the X-T1 is around 37mm thick, and it includes an articulated screen.

There was some speculation that the Nikon Df would be a mirrorless F-mount camera. But, as we saw with the mirrorless Pentax K-01 K-mount CSC, the lack of a mirror makes little difference in size. The K-01 just felt like a DSLR, except without the optical viewfinder, leaving some to cruelly describe it as being rather like a brick.

Related Video:

  

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  1. 1. Introduction
  2. 2. Fujifilm X-T1 vs Nikon Df - Build and Handling
  3. 3. Fujifilm X-T1 vs Nikon Df - Optical vs Electronic viewfinder
  4. 4. Fujifilm X-T1 vs Nikon Df - Sensor and Dynamic Range
  5. 5. Fujifilm X-T1 vs Nikon Df - ISO Comparison
  6. 6. Fujifilm X-T1 vs Nikon Df - Verdict
Page 1 of 6 - Show Full List
  • darwiniandude

    The Df makes me angry. They were so close! Pull up to turn PASM knob? Change AF modes by holding button on MF/AF whilst turning command dial? A trip to the menus to enable and disable auto ISO? Quite apart from the fact they could have ditched PASM entirely if they’d put Auto positions on shutter and iso dials. Plus, in manual mode exposure compensation does nothing. Why? It’s the exposure triangle. Three parameters. When aperture and shutter are fixed, exposure compensation dial should be adjusting ISO to balance the exposure if ISO is set to auto.

  • Simon

    I hope to get a DF next. As for the image review being off by default, then GOOD! It saves battery power, even for those few seconds, it all adds up if you are taking a lot of images. A good photographer gets it right and shouldnt need to keep viewing the images constantly. Buy a point and shoot if thats your level of ability

  • Chris Bradley

    I have just purchased a Nikon Df and set aside my Fujifilm XE-1. I own a Nikon F2A which I still use and have several AI and AIS lenses. Having purchased an adapter for the XE-1 the camera software seems to be flawed and I cannot get sharp images from my Nikkor’s. The XE-1 is a fine camera with great light portability and takes great pictures. The autofocus in video mode is a joke but then I am not too bothered about video. I just like things to work if they are included in something. The Df makes me smile…A lot. Install the lens sizes into its software and off you go. Nikkor AI/S lenses make modern lenses seem cheap and nasty and I don’t really mind having to turn that focus ring on my lenses. It actually makes me feel like I’m part of the process of taking the picture. If you just want point and shoot buy a Canon G10…They’r fantastic at everything and cheap now on ebay. I don’t see how anyone considering a Nikon Df would be remotely interested in a Fuji X-T1. The Nikon Df is a total stand alone. All those people who still buy older lenses for their modern Nikons…..Possibly, and those who still shoot 35mm on their prized Nikon F, They are the ones who Nikon Df’s appeal to. Plus of course others who wish to adopt the same policy that I have and enjoy photography again.

    The Nikon Df has a soul. It looks like a camera and not a carbon mis-hape. Look at the Nikon line up at six feet and they all look exactly the same. I like to be different. The Nikon Df is different. It evokes pleasure when you look at it by its appearance and even more in the process of taking a photograph.

    The dials stay where you set them unlike my XE-1 which always seemed to have some EV compensation accidentally set + or -, or the focus selector on one of the two settings you did not want. Oh and the Df has the same sensor that they fit in the Nikon D4. WOW!

    I would say that the Df is a thinking mans camera. I keep thinking of how I can draw a comparison with the Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing I once owned. Everyone else bought Fireblades and frowned at me Guzzy. Have you seen a Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing?

    In some ways I am looking forward to looking back at my Nikon Df, having given up on the pursuit of pixels and thinking that its nice to own a real classic. I just hope the the modern electronic shutters of today can give as much service as a Nikon F2. Somehow I doubt it.

  • Guest

    I have just purchased a Nikon Df and set aside my Fujifilm XE-1. I own a Nikon F2A which I still use and have several AI and AIS lenses. Having purchased an adapter for the XE-1 the camera software seems to be flawed and I cannot get sharp images from my Nikkor’s. The XE-1 is a fine camera with great light portability and takes great pictures. The autofocus in video mode is a joke but then I am not too bothered about video. I just like things to work if they are included in something. The Df makes me smile…A lot. Install the lens sizes into its software and off you go. Nikkor AI/S lenses make modern lenses seem cheap and nasty and I don’t really mind having to turn that focus ring on my lenses. It actually makes me feel like I’m part of the process of taking the picture. If you just want point and shoot buy a Canon G10…They’r fantastic at everything and cheap now on ebay. I don’t see how anyone considering a Nikon Df would be remotely interested in a Fuji X-T1. The Nikon Df is a total stand alone. All those people who still buy older lenses for their modern Nikons…..Possibly, and those who still shoot 35mm on their prized Nikon F, They are the ones who Nikon Df’s appeal to. Plus of course others who wish to adopt the same policy that I have and enjoy photography again.

    The Nikon Df has a soul. It looks like a camera and not a carbon mis-hape. Look at the Nikon line up at six feet and they all look exactly the same. I like to be different. The Nikon Df is different. It evokes pleasure when you look at it by its appearance and even more in the process of taking a photograph.

    The dials stay where you set them unlike my XE-1 which always seemed to have some EV compensation accidentally set + or -, or the focus selector on one of the two settings you did not want. Oh and the Df has the same sensor that they fit in the Nikon D4. WOW!

    I would say that the Df is a thinking mans camera. I keep thinking of how I can draw a comparison with the Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing I once owned. Everyone else bought Fireblades and frowned at me Guzzy. Have you seen a Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing?

    In some ways I am looking forward to looking back at my Nikon Df, having given up on the pursuit of pixels and thinking that its nice to own a real classic. I just hope the the modern electronic shutters of today can give as much service as a Nikon F2. Somehow I doubt it.