Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1

    Default Polarising filters...etc

    Do you good people use circular polarising filters? I have now bought a new canon lens 24-70 and have fitted a cir polarising filter to it. For the last few years I have got into the habit of fitting cir polarising filters to all my lenses and just left them on all the time. Regardless of the type of photo I was taking. One it protects the lens and two it gives deep rich colours and cut down glare.

    Been testing my new lens and was finding the results were coming out quite dark, also much darker than on the computer screen when having them printed as a glossy photo. I guess the darkness is down to the polarising filter? What I was doing was bumping up the exposure compensation a couple of notches to try and brighten them. Is that the correct way to get round it? Or should I say use a wider aperture or lower ISO ...etc?
    Maybe I should not use the polarising filter but use a uv filter all the time instead? I want to try and avoid having to constantly change filters. What filter do you use most of the time?

    Also, I am soon going away to Exmoor and want to try and take some good landscapes and try and photograph some farm animals and wild ponies. What filter should I keep on my camera for that outing?

    Really sorry to have so many questions. Grateful for any advice you can give me please on all the above.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NW England
    Posts
    1,163
    Images
    11

    Default

    I tend to use a uv filter on most of my lenses but only use a cp when i have to. have you tried to use the lens without any filters and on what body is it attached

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wave View Post
    I tend to use a uv filter on most of my lenses but only use a cp when i have to. have you tried to use the lens without any filters and on what body is it attached
    No I have not yet tried the lens (canon 24-70 L f4) without a filter. The body is a canon 60D.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NW England
    Posts
    1,163
    Images
    11

    Default

    cp filters tend o add 1 -1.5 stops. i would set up a test and photograph the same object with and with out the filter. what make of cp is it

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wave View Post
    cp filters tend o add 1 -1.5 stops. i would set up a test and photograph the same object with and with out the filter. what make of cp is it
    I think it's quite a good one - Hoya digital - about 80. I also think I need to experiment much more and as I am fairly new to photography it's probably me not judging the scene correctly. Some shots were trying to capture Big Ben tower against a fairly bright sky - so I would expect to use exposure compensation - correct?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NW England
    Posts
    1,163
    Images
    11

    Default

    if you have a bright back ground then your subject will be dark you could try and meter off of the subject but that will throw out the bright background. a cp will not help in this case. what i would do is take a bracketed shot and then merge them in post processing

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Ceredigion, south of Aberystwyth
    Posts
    163

    Default

    If you are using any one of the auto-metering modes, every mode except manual, then the camera should meter while taking account of the dark polarising filter. It shouldn't make much difference to the overall exposure, only to the polarised light, which you can adjust by rotating it.

    Protecting the lens? Hmm. I wonder whether you have actually ever damaged, or made a habit of damaging the filter itself? If not, may I ask what it is you are protecting the lens from?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •