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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default best camera & lens for shooting jewellery?

    I am looking for a good DSRL camera and lense to photograph jewellery.

    Would you be able to recommend a camera and lense to shoot professional-quality images good enough for print publications? The camera would need to give images that can than be processed in photoshop as 16 bit RAW files at a resolution of 300 dpi.

    I have already invested in a light tent and might be able to buy a second hand lighting kit.

    Could you recommend a good lense to shoot jewellery varying from 10 cm in diameter to 120cm x 30 cm for the larges pieces on a mannequin?

    As the camera will only be used for the sole purpose of shooting jewellery it would not need any additional frills such as video.

    At the most I could afford 1500 but if at all possible under 1000 would be less painful.


    many thanks for any advice you may have,
    ute

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West Dorset
    Posts
    30

    Default

    I would have thought that most manufacturers would be able to offer you a suitable system within your budget. If it were me i would pair up an Olympus body (e.g. E620 or E30) with their 50mm f2 lens , that's certainly an outstanding lens and an E620 plus the 50mm will come in at well under 1,000.

    Of course a lot of personal prejudice comes into that recommendation but you might be able to hire such a setup from www.e-group.uk.net for a few days to try out - and they will refund the hire cost if you do decide to buy.

    Roger

  3. #3

    Default re: best camera & lens for shooting jewellery?

    hello,



    It is very necessary to take photographs of jewelery very clearly.and everybody like to see it all art. so i think Lens Recommendation for shooting jewelry product shots Canon EOS Digital Cameras. i think it is very good for that job.



    good luck!!
    Last edited by TheFatControlleR; 03-05-10 at 04:03 PM. Reason: Remove signature link

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    London'ish
    Posts
    79
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    19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ute View Post
    Would you be able to recommend a camera and lense to shoot professional-quality images good enough for print publications?
    What is even more important than the equipment is the skill and knowledge of the photographer.

    Taking photographs of jewellery is a highly technical task, especially to get good quality images.

    What level of skills do you have?

    No matter what camera and lens (btw it DSLR) we could recommend, if you don't have the skills you won't get the results you want.

    This is why photographers that specialize in jewellery photography charge what they do. It's there knowledge and experience you are paying for and not the equipment they own.
    Fen .......... My http://www.fenris.co.uk/galleries.htm - My http://fen-oswin.blogspot.com/ - My http://www.flickr.com/photos/fenoswin/sets/

    "I never cared for fashion much, amusing little seams and witty little pleats: it was the girls I liked." - David Bailey

  5. #5

    Default

    Hello Everyone...

    It is necessary to take all photograph of jewellery clearly because all these things are dependents on photograph of jewellery. It is also one type of technical task. If you want any ideas then visit this site : http://www.samra.com/.

  6. #6

    Default

    hassanholf - I cannot believe your reply was, buy Canon as they make good cameras. Funny as you like. Yes they do, but it's not a reply that's going to help the OP now is it?!

    The OP should buy Nikon ......

    No, seriously. I'll try and explain this in laymans terms. A decent 12mp dslr like the Nikon D5000 (or Canon 500D) and the 18-55 VR kit lens will probably do the trick. That's less than 500 all in. If you are looking for real close up's a macro lens would do the trick, but I'm not sure that you'd need it. Some kit lenses, like Sigma's 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5 DC OS Macro HSM (300 ish), would give you the best of both world's. You could then buy the D5000 body only and save 60.

    Spend the rest of you money on your lighting (continuous and natural), tripod and remote release for the camera.

    If you have a bit of time, look on the web and see what they say about shooting jewelery. There's plenty of advice and they focus on things like ensuring sharpness, white balance, exposure, lighting etc

    Try here ....
    http://www.tabletopstudio.com/docume...hotography.htm

    Hope that helps.

    Cheers

    Bruce

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