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  1. #1

    Default Canon 1100D vs 600D - plea for responses :)

    It's me again! I hope more people will respond this time please as purchase is imminent and I don't want to make the wrong choice as I am going over my original budget

    So... I went into Jessops and explained everything I wanted to do and was told I needed an SLR - a compact/bridge wouldn't cut it. For my level (complete novice) the 1100D was recommended. I have compared the spec of both cameras on the Canon website but it didn't really assist my decision. When I spoke to the assistant (very helpful and knowledgeable) he said there wasn't much in it and for what I wanted the camera for, I should go for the 1100D - that it would be a vast difference on my current set up - and more money should be spent on good lenses. The 600D caught my eye due to the swivel LCD screen.

    These are the key things I want from my camera:

    Wide angle (essential)
    Good quality/colour images in low light (essential)
    Background blurring capability (essential)
    Rotating LCD (desirable)

    My interests in the main are portraits, landscape, architecture, art and people. I love macro but this will have to wait as I have seen the cost of the lenses!

    When I asked about how to get the background blurring, I was advised on a 50mm 1.8 lens to start off with. (That the 1.4 would be better but it is just too expensive right now at well over 300). However, on reading Canon's SLR guide that has been given as a "clicky" on many posts on this site, they are saying you need a telephoto lens to get that effect. So now I am totally confused Could someone please clear this up for me as it makes a difference to what lenses I get in my first bundle.

    Also, I have been told that the IS version of lenses are of no real value and not worth paying the extra money for. That for the kind of shots I'd like to take when camera shake might be a problem (low light) I would be better off investing in a tripod. Do you agree/disagree with this statement?

    FInally, I had a look at a tripod but, goodness me they are heavy (and expensive), and I don't really fancy lugging one of those around with me as well. The camera with lenses is enough to carry. Can I get away without a tripod if I invest in IS lenses? Or if I want beautiful low light images is a tripod the only way.

    By the way, this is all for pleasure etc. I am just a novice enthusiast who has reached the end of the road with the compact camera due to a number of limitations. So I don't need professional high end shots! Thank you for your time and patience Nicci
    Last edited by NicciJB; 21-03-12 at 06:32 PM.

  2. #2

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    Hi

    The 600D is the way to go. Articulated screen. Stunning 1,040,000 dot LCD (as against 230,00 on 1100D). Faster focussing and so on...
    When I asked about how to get the background blurring, I was advised on a 50mm 1.8 lens to start off with. (That the 1.4 would be better but it is just too expensive right now at well over 300). However, on reading Canon's SLR guide that has been given as a "clicky" on many posts on this site, they are saying you need a telephoto lens to get that effect. So now I am totally confused Could someone please clear this up for me as it makes a difference to what lenses I get in my first bundle.
    The 50mm 1.8 has a Crop factor of 1.6 so will be in fact an 80mm lens which is quite good for portrait. Because of the large aperture (1.8), backgrounds are thrown out of focus very quickly. However, go with the 18-55mm stock lens to start with as these are very good and will in fact be an 28.8-88mm which will do landscapes and portrait. See how you get on, then look around for either a wider lens for landscapes or telephoto for portrait and zoo type stuff.

    Also, I have been told that the IS version of lenses are of no real value and not worth paying the extra money for. That for the kind of shots I'd like to take when camera shake might be a problem (low light) I would be better off investing in a tripod. Do you agree/disagree with this statement?
    I like IS! saves me using a tripod - end of story! You can always use the 2 second timer on non IS lenses (stops that slight jerk when pressing the shutter). I also carry a small pocket tripod for those very low light shots and press it up against pillars, lamp posts and walls (easier with an articulated screen). I also use it on seats and pavements etc, with the 2 or 10 second timer.

    So, what are you waiting for?. Just go and geddit! lol

    PS. Don't forget, post processing is an important part of photography and should be used to sharpen and enhance pictures taken with any camera. If you don't have an imaging editor, then use the one in my signature below. There are 32 video tutorials to get you started. The most useful is the http://ictpublish.com/pixlr/Videoes/...06_Levels.html and for the advanced user. The http://ictpublish.com/pixlr/Videoes/...07_Curves.html is a must (it's my favourite all-in-one adjuster). My Resize-Crop-Sharpen tutorial below, will get your pics ready for the internet

    Have fun!


    .
    Last edited by Chris Cool; 21-03-12 at 07:09 PM.

  3. #3
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    hi ditto the above
    but let me add you will out grow the 1100d so save money and get the 600d in the long run. blurred back grounds is a function of depth of field and the distance to the subject.
    the 50 1.8 will give you this effect it is no IS but to be honest it is very light and comes in at under 90 you can also get it using a telephoto and a good reasonable choice is the the 55-250is. so you get the 600d with a kit lens 18-55 is the better option and you are good to go.
    all that said about the 600d you could save more money and get a 550d you only loose a swivel screen and wireless flash control. money saved goes to lenses

  4. #4

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    Thank you both - really helpful. I am still a bit confused about the background blurring lens - sorry to be thick.

    So is there any value purchasing the 50mm 1.8 lens? Or will the 18-55 IS lens that comes with the 600D suffice for background blur images? I cannot afford the 55-250 IS at the moment but thanks for the recommendation and I will add it to the wishlist

    I didn't think I would need a telephoto as I am not really interested in sports or animal photography (unless the telephoto would allow me to do macro of insects?)

    Chris, can I ask what small pocket tripod you use/would recommend please? Can I really get away without a tripod if I buy IS lenses? (as that is my preference). Again I will have to add the tripod to the wishlist as I am going way over budget!

    Finally, does it make a difference to what memory card you use? There are ultra, extreme, extreme pro etc? What are the basic differences please and what should I go for as a minimum for the 600D?

    Thank you kindly, Nicci

  5. #5
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    This is your first DSLR i would just buy the camera plus the kit 18-55 lens and then you need to practise maybe take a course or look at the online tutorials. then see how it goes before getting another lens. you will be able to blur the background with the kit lens as it is a relationship between dof and distance from subject. you can also add blur in post processing. as for memory cards you need class 6 or above.

  6. #6

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    I am still a bit confused about the background blurring lens - sorry to be thick.
    See this animated example http://web.canon.jp/imaging/enjoydslr/part2/2Ab.html under 'The narrower the depth of field, the more blurry it gets'. Go through the other lessons for more help with ISO, Exposure, Depth of Field, Aperture priority, Shutter priority etc...

    As Grant has said (Wave above), go for the the camera plus the kit 18-55 lens and take it from there.

    Chris, can I ask what small pocket tripod you use/would recommend please?
    I use the Hama Compact Digi-Pod Tripod http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pocket-Tri...item2eba3b8deb around town. Of course, if you're in the countryside in the middle of a field shooting low light, then you will need a proper tripod - you can always get a walking pole (with a 1/4" thread on) and stick it in the ground http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hama-Alpenpo.../dp/B002DOUXSA

    Can I really get away without a tripod if I buy IS lenses? (as that is my preference).
    Yes! - take IS off when using a tripod (and use 2 or 10 second timer), as the lens struggles with looking for no movement.

    Finally, does it make a difference to what memory card you use? There are ultra, extreme, extreme pro etc? What are the basic differences please and what should I go for as a minimum for the 600D?
    As mentioned, Class 6 will be fine, but at the moment 7 day shop have Class 10 for silly prices, so try one of them (7 day shop come highly recommended).

    OK, is that it for today? lol!


    Cheers!


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  7. #7

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    Thank you both so much and apologies for being high maintenance. I always have lots of questions!

    I am now the proud (and excited!) owner of a 600D with 18-55 IS lens, 50mm 1.8 lens and a Class 10 memory card Hurrah!

    I will check out the how to in terms of background blur, thank you. And thanks for the tip on taking IS off when on tripod/set timer etc. Very useful to have this info upfront.

    There might just be one more thing for today - re pocket tripods. The tripod you use states it is for a Panasonic DMC ZX3. When I was in Jessops we tried one of the small table top (?) tripods in the shop and the camera just flopped forward due to the weight of the camera. Are you aware of any decent pocket tripods that can hold the weight of a 600D? If not, I will live without a tripod for now as I really don't want to lug a full size one around.

    Thanks again. Your contributions have been worthwhile as I have now made my purchase based on your recommendations Nicci

  8. #8

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by NicciJB View Post
    They are ok, but just a tad too big for what I was talking about.

    The one I suggested is for holding in the hand when using pillars, posts and holding while resting on walls etc. Most of the time you won't need it with IS. For the price of a few quid, I'd try it out...

    Congrats on your purchase. You've made a very good choice


    Cheers!


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  10. #10

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    Ok, thank you. I'll give it a whirl

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