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  1. #1
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    Question All the idea...and no gear...

    Hi everyone. Brand newbie here, so please bear with me!

    After having quite a few people tell me I have an eye for photos... I have decided buy my first 'good' camera this year...the only problem is I don't really know much about is proving to be an unbelieveably complex market! Essentially, this is my situation in bullet points!
    • I have a budget of 600-800 total...but happy to stretch a little if its worth it
    • I have no real understanding of the majority of the jargon or tech speak yet, but learning slowly
    • I like the style/feel/interface of the Canon 60d (a friend has one but CANNOT explain anything to me without using incredibly complex tech speak!)
    • I probably won't be upgrading anytime soon so would like to buy the best I can afford rather than a beginners camera that I would soon grow out of
    • I want an 'all-rounder' lens - (most of my pics will be outdoors, sometimes with fast moving subjects, the remainder indoor family shots but generally well lit scenes)
    • I would like minimal fiddling for maximum result

    I appreciate that the above could be hugely subjective, but I am drowning in all the options and body/lens combos so really need to narrow down my searches!

    Hope some kind and patient souls can help me...in fairly plain english!

    Thanks,

    Alex

  2. #2
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    Hi and welcome, the first thing I would say is a 60d is a great camera and will do the job well but you will have to invest in a lens or 2. Next to look at your last point you can use a SDLR in auto mode but to get the best out of it you will have to use it in AV(aperture priority), TV (shutter priority) and manual mode. So is a DSLR what you want , if it is then i would take a course in photography to get you going.
    I would look at a 600d with a kit lens 18-55is and you should have enough for a 55-250is zoom on top of this I would also look at an external flash which will help. The 600d and 60d share the same sensor but the 600d is cheaper.

  3. #3
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    Hi thanks for the advice.

    I read about the 600d and it sounded good...but a few of the reviews said it was a little flimsy...or rather, not as robust as a 60d. When they say 'less robust'...are we talking likely to be easy to break with normal usage or are we talking about surviving being dropped?!


    How portable are the bigger lenses in real terms....ie.....could you feasibly take a camera with a whopping lens out snapping with the family is it something that needs a stand?

    Told you my questions were stupid! I am definitely looking at courses btw.... seems like something you need to be taught before being set loose with all those buttons!

  4. #4
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    I have the 550d and it is a plastic body same as the 600d but it does not feel flimsy. Like every thing else who knows about a drop it may survive but that would be the same as a 60d. The 55-250is lens isnt a big lens it is a little bigger than the 18-55 so quite easy to carry around I have used mine around Seaworld all day no not a problem.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clickhappy View Post
    Hi everyone. Brand newbie here, so please bear with me!

    After having quite a few people tell me I have an eye for photos... I have decided buy my first 'good' camera this year...the only problem is I don't really know much about is proving to be an unbelieveably complex market! Essentially, this is my situation in bullet points!
    • I have a budget of 600-800 total...but happy to stretch a little if its worth it
    • I have no real understanding of the majority of the jargon or tech speak yet, but learning slowly
    • I like the style/feel/interface of the Canon 60d (a friend has one but CANNOT explain anything to me without using incredibly complex tech speak!)
    • I probably won't be upgrading anytime soon so would like to buy the best I can afford rather than a beginners camera that I would soon grow out of
    • I want an 'all-rounder' lens - (most of my pics will be outdoors, sometimes with fast moving subjects, the remainder indoor family shots but generally well lit scenes)
    • I would like minimal fiddling for maximum result

    I appreciate that the above could be hugely subjective, but I am drowning in all the options and body/lens combos so really need to narrow down my searches!

    Hope some kind and patient souls can help me...in fairly plain english!

    Thanks,

    Alex
    Hi Alex. Many of us DSLR users end up with quite a few lenses and seperate flashguns, and by the time we've finished our camera bags weigh far too much to walk far with. Camera makers have caught on to this and have now brought out a much smaller, lighter type of camera called CSC, (compact system camera). They are highly specified with some having sensors equal and better than many DSLR's.(Digital Single Lens Reflex).Check out the Panasonic GX1 on the web, it scored best in a recent test of 6 cameras (CSC's). I think many of us will end up buying one of these at some point. Great results and not much bulk to carry, the GX1 retails for app 740, so they're not cheap. All the best.
    Humility is an endearing quality and gains many friends, whereas arrogance loses them. Mike, 2012

  6. #6
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    hi in the end its down to what you prefer. My advice is if you havent done so already go and try them out, see how they feel are the buttons right for you. does the system you want have the right lenses. In the end if it feels right then that goes along way to being right. Dont settle for I will get used to it. Good luck

  7. #7

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    Hi Clickhappy

    I'm new here too. Like you I was taking good photos and was quite often the only one with a camera. I mean, who goes on holiday or to a wedding without a camera? Insane. Anyway I upgraded from a compact to a DSLR Nikon D60. I liked the guy in the shop, he had one too, seemed a bit smaller and lighter than the others in the price range so I went for it.

    I did a few courses in night school (totally recommend). Initially a beginners course to learn how to take it out of "auto". What I will say is that there were 10 people on the beginner course, no two cameras were the same (some very expensive DSLRs and one compact) but by the end we were all taking wonderful photos. So perhaps it doesn't matter, just find one that feels right I guess.

    Sorry, that doesn't help does it? Good luck! x

  8. #8

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    Hi Clickhappy,

    You've been getting some good advice. If you're wanting to learn photography and take a course, then a DSLR is the way to go.

    You've mentioned the 60D, but just having a look around and the 60D is pushing your budget...you'll be looking at almost 1000 for a 60D and lens.

    The 600D is, internally at least, identical to the 60D in many respects. It shares the same resolution, flip-out screen and most other features. The biggest difference is in the build-quality. The 60D has a more durable feel with better weather sealing over the 600D, but this is not to say the 600D isn't well made. The construction may be predominately plastic, but its been put together to a high standard and should withstand a decent amount of use.

    If you opt for the 600D, then you can pick out a twin lens kit for 819. This includes the camera body, an 18-55mm standard zoom lens and a 55-250mm telephoto zoom that'll allow you to get in close to your subject. Both lenses have an anti-shake system to reduce camera blur, meaning you'll be able to hand-hold them in most shooting situations.

    If you're looking for a light-weight, versatile camera kit that'll allow you to grow as you develop your skills, this is a great option. Otherwise, take a look at the Nikon D5100 - very similar to the 600D, but has a more beginner orientated interface and are a similar price. The twin lens kit is just under 800. Go and try both out for yourself to see how you get on as you'll get more of a feel for them once you've had a play with them. You won't walk away with a bad camera if you pick either.

  9. #9

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    Hi Clickhappy

    I am new to photography so probably not the best person to give you advice, however your list is simmilar to my own so I went for a bridge camera. You have all the fetures of a DSLR but with just one lens to cope with, mine has a 28mm to 720mm with a 30x zoom in old money you would possibly need 3 lenses to give you the range I have with one fixed lens.

    No doubt someone will have beter ideas but the more you get will give you a better chance to get which is best for you.

    P.S Take a look on karltaylorphotography.co.uk for a free micro course which will give you a good grounding in the jargon etc.

    Good luck

    Charles

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