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  1. #11
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    Jan 2010
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    Hi knave just noticed on the home page an article on flash basics.
    I would like to say that flash is not as easy as people think, it takes a lot of practises, so don't worry about asking questions. An external flash opens up a whole new world.

  2. #12
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    Ive been reading some quite in-depth articles online. It is true, its not simple. I'll be posting a photograph of dragonflies in flight taken with the in-camera flash.

  3. #13
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    Hi guys. Just posted a photograph of two dragonflies in flight taken on Monday this week with Nikon d70s, Tamron 90mm di macro @ 1/500secs flash sync.

  4. #14
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    Hi I like the picture of the dragon flies I am no expert on this type of photography but flash does freeze time the only other thing to do is get a faster lens and try that. I know that canon cameras can use high speed sync if the flash can do it.

  5. #15
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    Hi Wave,
    I doubt even the fastest lens would be able to give enough speed for this type of photography unless the giving light at the time is bright enough. A very fast flash shutter speed is the only way, to my knowledge. Although newer cameras (Nikon) do have a FP High Speed option when used with external flash units, but even that is not True flash-sync speed,

    I am still confused as to why the first generation of DSLRS (D70, D40 etc.) had such a fast useful Flash-sync speed (1/500sec). But all of the next generations of DSLRS has had their Flash-sync speed lowered quite significantly.

    Why?

  6. #16

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    Once upon a time, when our parent century was barely forty, highly powered future computers were imagined to be technological titans. To be effective, each computational colossus would need to be the size of a skyscraper, or so scientists speculated.

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