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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Sharper Photos - Advanced Photography Techniques

    http://benevansphotography.com/tutor...adyphotos.html

    I've written a guide to getting steadier photos by using the Principles of Marksmanship that are used in shooting by snipers.

    They're advanced photography techniques for when you want to shoot at speeds of 1/60s and below, such as music or documentary photography in low-light.

    You can also use them to make sure you take fewer blurry photos when you use a smaller aperture or if you'd like to use slow-sync flash.

    The tutorial for sharper photos is here; http://benevansphotography.com/tutor...adyphotos.html

    If you find it useful, please let me know by clicking on the Facebook 'like' button at the top of the page.

  2. #2
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    Hi ben .Had a quick look at it and find it very interesting. I'm a wee bit stuck for time at the moment ,but will peruse it throughout later. Also ticked the like button ... gaham

  3. #3

    Thumbs up

    nice write up ben
    just read it ive all so linked your link to my facebook page
    my self I have seen videos of there's technique's but i have a few other people on my facebook page that it might help
    thanks for sharing it

    russ

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by BenEvansPhotography View Post

    They're advanced photography techniques for when you want to shoot at speeds of 1/60s and below, such as music or documentary photography in low-light.
    Works for macro photography too as even with high shutter speeds you need to be rock steady to place the focus accurately. I was getting funny looks kneeling in a puddle in a butterfly farm the other week but that's where I needed to be to get the shot so that's what I did....I'm sure you will understand

    Same with extended periods of shooting - it really pays to get yourself comfortable and use your bones instead of your muscles to support the camera whenever possible. Last Sunday I took somewhere in the region of 2500-3000 shots of runners (single shots, no continuous shooting!) and would have really struggled if I'd being holding the camera like a tourist.

    Good advice and useful in lots of situations (not on facebook to like it there)

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Thanks Russ and Graham for the feedback.

    I'd not thought about using the techniques for macro photography but I will do. The editing on those 3000 photos must take you a while!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by BenEvansPhotography View Post
    The editing on those 3000 photos must take you a while!
    I didn't get a change to review what I shot let alone edit them....was shooting JPEG and aiming for print-ready exposures for one of those sites the competitors can buy their pics from. They have some OCR software and a database of names to cross reference the numbers with so I just had to hand the memory card back at the end of the event.

    Was quite good fun though....and a good excuse to go shooting with my dad

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by daft_biker View Post
    Works for macro photography too as even with high shutter speeds you need to be rock steady to place the focus accurately. I was getting funny looks kneeling in a puddle in a butterfly farm the other week but that's where I needed to be to get the shot so that's what I did....I'm sure you will understand

    Same with extended periods of shooting - it really pays to get yourself comfortable and use your bones instead of your muscles to support the camera whenever possible. Last Sunday I took somewhere in the region of 2500-3000 shots of runners (single shots, no continuous shooting!) and would have really struggled if I'd being holding the camera like a tourist.

    Good advice and useful in lots of situations (not on facebook to like it there)
    Yes I got in some amazing positions this morning, crawling on my belly beside a muddy pond at sunrise to get a shot of a ruddy duck or whatever kind of duck it was !! Got back in the car elated as photographers do when they think a fantastic shot is won. Turned on the heater, oh my god, what's that awful smell !! Oh no it's all down the front of my combat jacket, is it duck ****, badger, fox !! Should have stayed in bed !!!

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