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  1. #1

    Question 35mm Converter for DSLR

    Hello.

    New to photography. Have an old Canon 35mm film camera with extra lenses. Brought a Canon DSLR.

    Is it a myth or can you buy a lens converter to use old 35mm lenses with DSLR?
    (If possible links)

    I'm OK without the AF.. As I prefer MF..

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    Was your 35mm camera one of the Canon EOS series?

    if so, you should be able to use the lenses of the Canon DSLR as it's the same EOS fitting
    Fen .......... My http://www.fenris.co.uk/galleries.htm - My http://fen-oswin.blogspot.com/ - My http://www.flickr.com/photos/fenoswin/sets/

    "I never cared for fashion much, amusing little seams and witty little pleats: it was the girls I liked." - David Bailey

  3. #3

    Question 35mm Converter for DSLR

    Nope... I have an even older one.. T70... I loved this camera. I used this camer all the time.. Then brought a simple compact digital.... Thought wait a little... I wasstill shooting film and it's getting too expensive to continue.

    Now I have been using my dad's EOS1000D.. I'm not working lost my job about a year ago... so funds are limited and enjoyed macro photography... Have some good macro lenses that I would like to use if possible...

    Thanks again.

  4. #4
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    Sorry it I am butting in on Fen's response but I have spent about 20 years quietly grumbling (sometimes not so quietly) about Canon's lack of an upgrade path from FD lenses to EOS cameras. I believe that adaptors do exist that allow that allow macro photography with these lenses (but not infinity focus) and some adaptors have built in lenses to allow infinity focus - but the latter have a poor reputation for image quality.

    My story has a happy ending as I now own an Olympus PEN for which a good adaptor exists but that may be of no comfort to you if funds are limited

    Roger

  5. #5
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    Whereas I've spent the last 20 years so pleased that Canon abandoned FD and adopted a fully electronic mount with no hangovers - it's meant I've had ultrasonic motors in my lenses for all that 20 years, that I had image stabilisation for much of it, with film as well as digital, and full compatibility within those 20 years, and none of that would've been possible without that decision.

    Anyway, if you want to use the lenses for macro, you don't need one with a glass element to maintain infinity focus - the cheaper ones without will do fine, with the added benefit that you'll be able to focus even closer than you could with your T70

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by NRoberts View Post
    Whereas I've spent the last 20 years so pleased that Canon abandoned FD and adopted a fully electronic mount with no hangovers - it's meant I've had ultrasonic motors in my lenses for all that 20 years, that I had image stabilisation for much of it, with film as well as digital, and full compatibility within those 20 years, and none of that would've been possible without that decision.

    Anyway, if you want to use the lenses for macro, you don't need one with a glass element to maintain infinity focus - the cheaper ones without will do fine, with the added benefit that you'll be able to focus even closer than you could with your T70
    TBH I think that it was a poor choice of flange to film distance that caused the problems and not the decision to go fully electronic.

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