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  1. #1

    Default Buying advice - DSLR

    Hello, I hope you can help me.
    I know very little about cameras, but want to purchase one for a very specific purpose.

    It would be to take digital photographs through a microscope (Brunel SP-200 research compound microscope) of fish scales for aging. Apparently adaptors to attach most digital cameras to a microscope are available, I just need to decide on the camera….

    From what I’ve read I need a digital SLR camera. The shutter must continue to work when the lens has been removed as the microscope acts as the lens. It must also have through the lens light metering. The image needs to be high resolution for work with various softwares, but my understanding is that 12 mega pixels is big enough which from what I’ve read is fairly standard for many SLR cameras.

    Apart from this I have very few restrictions, but there are so many cameras out there!
    I also have no idea of what this sort of camera might cost, though it goes without saying, the less I can spend without compromising on functionality and quality the better.

    So my questions are:
    Could anyone suggest a few cameras fitting my description that I should look at more closely?
    Also, has anyone done this sort of work before? If so, what camera do you use?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    West Dorset
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    Default

    TBH I think that you ought to email the microscope makers support team - I assume that they have one. In particular ask them what is the size of the focussed image circle from the lens. I suspect that this will be relaively small and in that case one of the four thirds cameras with 18×13.5 mm sensors would be ideal but it is possible that the circle is too big to fit onto such a sensor without cropping the image and in that case you would need to chose a camera with a larger sensor. Once you know the size of that circle it be possible to calculate how many pixels will be used to take the image and this will be as least as important as the headline resolution of the camera.

    Sorry if that is not much help

    Roger

  3. #3

    Default cheers

    many thanks Roger.
    I will try to find out these details and hopefully I'll be able to narrow down what I need.

  4. #4

    Default image size

    Hello,

    I've spoken to the manufacturers of the microscope and the image size through the microscope is 20mm.
    So, does this mean I should be buying a camera with a full frame sensor?

    thanks for your help

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West Dorset
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    Quote Originally Posted by powangirl View Post
    Hello,

    I've spoken to the manufacturers of the microscope and the image size through the microscope is 20mm.
    So, does this mean I should be buying a camera with a full frame sensor?

    thanks for your help

    It all depends upon what you need (and are prepared to pay for) If you want to show the whole image circle the I think that you would need a full frame camera, and you would then get a circular image.

    If on the other hand you were prepared to accept some clipping even the smallest (four thirds or micro four thirds - they are the same size) sensor would show the full image circle diagonally as it has a diagonal measurement of 21.6mm but obviously the top and sides of that circle would be missing. Here is a link to the dimensions of 4/3 sensors http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro_Four_Thirds_system

    An APS-C sensor (25.1 × 16.7 mm) would show the complete image horizontally, with curved edges, but not the top and bottom

    If your main intention is to ultimately use the images in rectangular format then 4/3 or micro four thirds would be fine but if you need to recover all possible information you will need a larger format camera.

    It might be worth while getting a some squared paper and a compass and drawing some diagrams before you make a decision

    There are some very good bargains around at the moment in micro four thirds cameras.



    Roger
    Last edited by RogerMac; 18-07-10 at 01:17 PM.

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