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View Full Version : Please help - Canon 1100d vs Panasonic DMC-FZ150??



ElliotR
15-03-12, 01:48 PM
Hi all,

My head is fried from sifting through all the reviews available for both the above cameras.

I'm looking to get a good camera to take on Safari in the summer and then for general use when I get back for things like landscapes, wildlife, family occasions etc.

I must stress though I'm a complete amateur though so am unsure whether i would get the most out of a dslr and be better off seeing how I get on with a good bridge and take it from there.

Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

canismajor
15-03-12, 03:08 PM
hi and welcome. Of the two cameras you mention you should consider this: The Panasonic is reported to be a useful tool especially with its huge zoom range, making it ideal for wildlife. Some users report a loss of quality at above 400 ISO though. The Canon DSLR will produce better quality pics because of its sensor. To get the same zoom as the FZ150 would cost an enormous amount of money by way of an extra lens. The Canon 600mm lens costs 10,820 so you see what I mean! As a DSLR user myself I find them quite easy to use and I'm an OAP, so you should be ok with one. As always, the price determines what we can afford at the time, so I wish you all the best.

Chris Cool
15-03-12, 04:06 PM
The Panasonic FZ150 has a small sensor like the one in compacts so it's up to you if you want a Bridge or a Compact to lug around. In the end they both do the same thing...

If you want to see what it's like to use a DSLR. Then take a look at Canons basic DSLR tutorials in picture form (http://web.canon.jp/imaging/enjoydslr/index.html) and learn how to use one and find out about ISO, Exposure, Depth of Field, Aperture priority, Shutter priority etc.

Read what the Crop Factor (Focal Length Multiplier) (http://www.tutorial9.net/tutorials/photography-tutorials/crop-factor/) means in terms of sensor size and lenses.

If you want a pocket do-it-all camera then have a look at the Sony HX9V Clicky (http://www.whatdigitalcamera.com/videos/reviews/530286/sony-dsc-hx9-review.html) ---- Images Clicky (http://www.whatdigitalcamera.com/equipment/galleries/sample-images/sony/34201/1/sony-cybershot-dsc-hx9v-test-images.html) ---- Another review with images Clicky (http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/sony_cybershot_dsc_hx9v_review/)

Don't forget, post processing is an important part of photography and should be used to sharpen and enhance pictures taken with any camera. If you don't have an imaging editor, then use the one in my signature below. There are 32 video tutorials to get you started. The most useful is the Adjusting levels (http://ictpublish.com/pixlr/Videoes/06_Levels/06_Levels.html) and for the advanced user. The Curves tool (http://ictpublish.com/pixlr/Videoes/07_Curves/07_Curves.html) is a must (it's my favourite all-in-one adjuster). My Resize-Crop-Sharpen tutorial below, will get your pics ready for the internet :cool:

Cheers!



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ElliotR
15-03-12, 06:26 PM
Hi guys,

Thanks for the replies.

I'm aware that the sesor on a bridge camera is smaller than what you'd get with a dslr but from an amature perspective what limitations does this create?

Sorry if this is a pretty basic question but im struggling to figure out the main draw backs the panasonic would give me if I'm probably not wanting to edit the pictures much once taken?

Cheers

Chris Cool
15-03-12, 07:43 PM
Hi guys,

Thanks for the replies.

I'm aware that the sesor on a bridge camera is smaller than what you'd get with a dslr but from an amature perspective what limitations does this create?

Sorry if this is a pretty basic question but im struggling to figure out the main draw backs the panasonic would give me if I'm probably not wanting to edit the pictures much once taken?

CheersYou always need to enhance digital photos (if you want the best out of them) unless taken under the most perfect of light conditions, so except that fact first, no matter what camera you are using (it only takes a couple of minutes to adjust them).

The small sensors work best in good light and when you want everything in focus at all times. In low light they require the use of a tripod. I use a pocket one with my compact and rest it on walls, pavements, lamp posts, pillars etc. using the 2 second timer. The zoom on a small sensor is the smallest and cheapest way to get those big magnifications. See my site below as to what's possible with a compact.

The larger sensor of the DSLR allows more light to pass, so is better in low light (clubs, night venues etc.) and will throw backgrounds out of focus when say taking portraits etc. It's a lot more expensive for lenses as well. Print sizes can be upto A3 in size.

As a rough analogy, the small sensors are about the size of a 5p piece and the APS-C sensor about the size of a 50p piece...

Cheers!



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ElliotR
16-03-12, 08:05 AM
Hi Chris,

Thanks for for the last post, i think it's all starting to make more sense now.

Another question though...the out of focus background effect when taking portraits is something im a fan of, is this possible with the features on the panasonic or something thats only possible with a DSLR?

Thanks

canismajor
16-03-12, 01:33 PM
Hi, throwing the background out of focus is simplicity itself. If the FZ150 has a manual facility then select it and use an f stop such as f5.6 or even f4. Obviously you will focus on the main subject but use a large aperture such as the ones I've just mentioned. What you are considering is DOF, (depth Of Field) which works like this. The smaller the aperture the greater the DOF and almost everything will be in focus. A small aperture would be f16 or f22 for example. Think of the aperture as an adjustable hole in the lens which governs how much light is let through to make an exposure. It seems back to front, but the bigger the number(f22) the smaller the hole. The smaller the number(f4) the bigger the hole. All the best, Mike.

Chris Cool
16-03-12, 02:31 PM
Hi, throwing the background out of focus is simplicity itself. If the FZ150 has a manual facility then select it and use an f stop such as f5.6 or even f4. Obviously you will focus on the main subject but use a large aperture such as the ones I've just mentioned. What you are considering is DOF, (depth Of Field) which works like this. The smaller the aperture the greater the DOF and almost everything will be in focus. A small aperture would be f16 or f22 for example. Think of the aperture as an adjustable hole in the lens which governs how much light is let through to make an exposure. It seems back to front, but the bigger the number(f22) the smaller the hole. The smaller the number(f4) the bigger the hole. All the best, Mike.
Unfortunately the sensor on the FZ150 is very small, so compared to a DSLR, is always shooting at around F11-F16... the background is therefore not thrown out of focus as suggested...

There is a sort of workaround that can be used for portraiture and that is to keep the subject well away from the background. Example 1. Supposing you are in the middle of a large square with a fountain. The subject is placed next to the fountain. Depending on where you stand and how much zoom you use, will determine how much the background past the fountain is out focus.

Example 2. You stand your subject 10 feet in front of the fountain. Both subject and fountain will be sharp, as the fountain is just too close...

See this example (I couldn't find what I wanted for digital cameras, so have used a movie example which shows the dramatic difference between different sizes of film/sensor)

The 35mm movie camera has a shallow depth of focus = Full frame 35mm DSLR
The 1/3rd" has more depth (still not good) = a slightly larger size sensor in a more expensive Bridge or Compact camera.
The 1/4" is all in focus = the FZ150 and most others with very small sensors.

http://wiki.letusdirect.com/_media/other-info/dof-chart.jpg
Source of image (http://wiki.letusdirect.com/other-info/depth-of-field)

Hope that helps!

PS. Something like the Nikon Coolpix P7100 (http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/nikon_coolpix_p7100_review/) has the slightly larger sensor that will help a bit...

Cheers!


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canismajor
16-03-12, 05:00 PM
Hi Chris, it's a good thing there are clever 'techie' guys like you around, you always seem able to add that something extra which us ordinary mortals fail to do. All the best, Mike.

Chris Cool
16-03-12, 05:11 PM
Hi Chris, it's a good thing there are clever 'techie' guys like you around, you always seem able to add that something extra which us ordinary mortals fail to do. All the best, Mike.Thanks Mike :)
However, I'm not that clever. Just learnt a long time ago that KISS is the answer. Keep It Simple Simon (Stupid) seems to work best at any level lol :cool: