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View Full Version : FUJI S2950 need help with night time settings (new york trip)



neil3011
29-12-11, 06:16 PM
hi all,
im totally new to digital cameras and would like some pointers on the following.

in feb,im going to new york for a once in a lifetime trip where alot of my photos will be taken at night and from a high distance (top of empire states,rockerfella etc etc)
I have a fuji s2950 and was wondering if anyone can help me out with the best settings??

will simply choosing night time mode give me the best shot or will i need to set them manually myself?

thanks in advance.

canismajor
30-12-11, 05:49 PM
hi all,
im totally new to digital cameras and would like some pointers on the following.

in feb,im going to new york for a once in a lifetime trip where alot of my photos will be taken at night and from a high distance (top of empire states,rockerfella etc etc)
I have a fuji s2950 and was wondering if anyone can help me out with the best settings??

will simply choosing night time mode give me the best shot or will i need to set them manually myself?

thanks in advance.
Hi Neil. Taking pics at night usually requires a tripod because of the slow shuter speeds which can make a blurred image. You will also find that it will be necessary to use the self-timer so that at the moment of capture your hands will not be on the camera. Experiment with both night settings and manual exposure, checking the results to see which gives the best image. Always check what you have just taken before moving on, if the pics are too dark they are under-exposed, too light and they are over-exposed. Learn as you go, but do check the results. Carry spare camera batteries always for night shoots, and a small torch so that you can see the camera controls clearly. Have a great time, all the best.

neil3011
30-12-11, 09:45 PM
Hi Neil. Taking pics at night usually requires a tripod because of the slow shuter speeds which can make a blurred image. You will also find that it will be necessary to use the self-timer so that at the moment of capture your hands will not be on the camera. Experiment with both night settings and manual exposure, checking the results to see which gives the best image. Always check what you have just taken before moving on, if the pics are too dark they are under-exposed, too light and they are over-exposed. Learn as you go, but do check the results. Carry spare camera batteries always for night shoots, and a small torch so that you can see the camera controls clearly. Have a great time, all the best.

thank you for the reply.
in regards to under and over exposing,what does this mean exactly?
im a total newb to more proffesional cameras and know very little about them.
does the ISO have anything to do with under/over exposing??

spinno
03-01-12, 02:00 PM
Hi
don't know if you've read the manual but on page 22 it describes two night scene modes. One is where it raises the sensitivity of the sensor so that you can take a picture hand held or the other is where you use a tripod (doesn't have to be a huge monstrosity but rather a small one which would fit in your luggage) and you take a picture that way. My recommendation would be to use the tripod method and set the self timer, not necessarily to get yourself in the picture:) but to avoid camera shake.
If you're in doubt about camera terms use a search engine to look them up...alternately use the search facility on the forum!