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cubz
14-11-11, 10:51 PM
recently bought my first dslr camera and took hundreds of pic at weekend with it but was not happy with alot of them as seemed to have person too low in pic like there eye level in middle of pic, so speaking to my friend he said golden rule is that persons eye level is 3/4 from bottom of pic. is that correct?

does anyone else have any other tips or useful pointers i should remember when taking pictures.???

canoman
27-12-11, 11:49 AM
recently bought my first dslr camera and took hundreds of pic at weekend with it but was not happy with alot of them as seemed to have person too low in pic like there eye level in middle of pic, so speaking to my friend he said golden rule is that persons eye level is 3/4 from bottom of pic. is that correct?

does anyone else have any other tips or useful pointers i should remember when taking pictures.???

Rule of thirds ,laterally and vertically.

graham_c
27-12-11, 04:52 PM
Some DSLR's have a framing grid that will help you compose your photos.

wave
28-12-11, 08:47 AM
Rule of thirds compose through the view finder for better control

canismajor
28-12-11, 08:19 PM
Do also remember that as you compose your subject, what you see in the viewfinder will be your photo, or as some say, what you see is what you get. Of course the rule of thirds applies and as Graham points out, some cameras have a grid pattern which you look through to help you place the subject correctly. All the best.

fayf
31-01-12, 06:10 PM
As others said, the rule of thirds is important.
Also, I think getting lighting right is vital.

luke
13-06-12, 09:07 PM
Hi Cubz,

I find what help me is to slow down especially when you are starting of, you mentioned that you took hundreds of photos, i think one way to improve is to put the camera on auto and just limit your self to 24 photos. This way every photos you take is valuable and you can only press the button ounce you have thought about composition.

Lead lines and rule of thirds are great techniques to use but these are only 5% of photography you need to worry about tone, colour, great light the subject you are taking and what you want your audience to look at after you have taken the photo.

If you don't control and dictate what you want your audience to focus on then we wont have a chance to see what you saw as you look though your lens.

I hope this helps

Cheers,

Luke