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Jpgr31
12-10-11, 06:49 PM
Hi everyone! I do not yet own a flash gun yet, so this question might not seem so dumb! Will a dedicated flash gun increase the flash sync speed over the in camera flash? I own a nikon d70s at the moment, looking to upgrade in the near future. Thanks!

wave
12-10-11, 07:43 PM
Your ca,era syncs at 1/500 not sure if it has high sync feature

Jpgr31
12-10-11, 10:21 PM
Hi wave, not quite understanding what you mean. If i bought the nikon d7000 and nikon sb-400 flashgun, what would be the fastest flash-sync speed avaliable?

wave
13-10-11, 08:02 AM
hi your camera has a speed at which it syncs the d7000 will sync at speeds up to 1/250th. It doesnt matter whether it is an external or internal flash. with some flashes high speed sync is available i am not sure if the sb400 supports it

Jpgr31
13-10-11, 10:13 AM
If thats really the case, then im quite dissapointed:(. As i would like to work with flash speed 1/500secs or faster. I still find it hard to believe that the fastest flash sync speed possible on the new D7000 is only 1/250!? :mad:

Dudley
13-10-11, 12:46 PM
Hi

I think you are confusing the Sync Speed ( maximum shutter speed for using flash) with the flash duration. To set a short duration flash, set your flash to manual, and select a low power setting. Then try to capture the short duration event you are trying to picture ( difficult part ).

Jpgr31
13-10-11, 01:07 PM
Hi

I think you are confusing the Sync Speed ( maximum shutter speed for using flash) with the flash duration. To set a short duration flash, set your flash to manual, and select a low power setting. Then try to capture the short duration event you are trying to picture ( difficult part ).

I dont have a flashgun yet. But if i wanted to freeze the wings of a fast flying insect such as a dragonfly, i still can with the newer cameras? My old D70s has a fast sync speed of 1/500secs and has been great for that.

wave
13-10-11, 02:41 PM
flash tends to freeze motion even at slow speeds its a strange thing but try it
http://photo.net/nikon-camera-forum/00L9Ux
this links is from some one who found this

Dudley
13-10-11, 02:46 PM
I dont have a flashgun yet. But if i wanted to freeze the wings of a fast flying insect such as a dragonfly, i still can with the newer cameras? My old D70s has a fast sync speed of 1/500secs and has been great for that.

The sync speed won't make much difference, as the final exposure is controlled by the flash duration, this is why you have to set the flash to manual. Almost any reasonably specced flash will achieve what you want. I can certainly do it with my Sony A350, which only syncs at 1/250. The more powerful the flashgun the better, as it will give you more flexibility at lower power ratios. You certainly should be able to freeze dragonfly wings, getting the insect in front of your lens is much more of a challenge. Practice with water drops, to get an idea of what you are dealing with first.

Jpgr31
13-10-11, 05:28 PM
Im starting to feel like an idiot now :confused: even for someone whose never used a flashgun! So what you are saying is that if the flash is manually set to are fast enough duration, the camera shutter speed would not determine the overall results of the freeze motion?

wave
14-10-11, 06:37 AM
Hi knave just noticed on the home page an article on flash basics.
I would like to say that flash is not as easy as people think, it takes a lot of practises, so don't worry about asking questions. An external flash opens up a whole new world.

Jpgr31
14-10-11, 10:38 PM
Ive been reading some quite in-depth articles online. It is true, its not simple. I'll be posting a photograph of dragonflies in flight taken with the in-camera flash.

Jpgr31
15-10-11, 11:56 AM
Hi guys. Just posted a photograph of two dragonflies in flight taken on Monday this week with Nikon d70s, Tamron 90mm di macro @ 1/500secs flash sync.

wave
17-10-11, 07:33 AM
Hi I like the picture of the dragon flies I am no expert on this type of photography but flash does freeze time the only other thing to do is get a faster lens and try that. I know that canon cameras can use high speed sync if the flash can do it.

Jpgr31
17-10-11, 09:11 AM
Hi Wave,
I doubt even the fastest lens would be able to give enough speed for this type of photography unless the giving light at the time is bright enough. A very fast flash shutter speed is the only way, to my knowledge. Although newer cameras (Nikon) do have a FP High Speed option when used with external flash units, but even that is not True flash-sync speed,

I am still confused as to why the first generation of DSLRS (D70, D40 etc.) had such a fast useful Flash-sync speed (1/500sec). But all of the next generations of DSLRS has had their Flash-sync speed lowered quite significantly.

Why?

AkiliBunny
24-10-11, 06:50 AM
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